For Women, it’s Gender Bias, But It’s a Pipeline Issue for Men

Achieving gender parity in the workplace along with bridging the wage gap is quite a long way off and one of the biggest reasons for the slow progress is that men and women see the world the professional world differently and this also includes one of the biggest issues of our time, gender parity at work. While 44 percent of men think that women are being well represented if there is one woman on the senior leadership team, only 22 percent of women would agree with the same. Does one woman make for women’s representation? 

40% say women are judged by different standards. (Only 14 percent of men see it that way)

Findings from McKinsey and LeanIn.org reveal that previously men thought that women were better represented even though data proved that they were quite wrong. Moreover, even as more men are speaking out in public about gender parity in the professional world, there is a big difference as to what it the root cause of it among men and women. “Men are most likely to say the trouble is “too few qualified women in the pipeline.” However, when asked, women say this is simply not true since they are held to different standards than men. ‘Forty percent say women are judged by different standards. (Only 14 percent of men see it that way.) Nineteen percent of women correctly perceive that junior women are less likely than junior men to get that first promotion into management. (Only 7 percent of men see that.) And 32 percent of women say women lack sponsors to champion their work. (Only 12 percent of men agree.)’

Study after study has revealed that the lack of sponsors has stalled the careers of many

Is it because women have fewer sponsors in their careers than men? Study after study has revealed that the lack of sponsors has stalled the careers of many. Also, senior male leaders are reluctant to mentor and sponsor junior women in the workplace. David Smith, associate professor of sociology at the Naval War College and co-author of “Athena Rising,” said “There’s this urban myth that gosh, somehow in this post-MeToo workplace, women have become dangerous or scary. They might just decide to falsely accuse us of sexual harassment. There is no evidence to support that. Men must push back when they hear that.” In addition to this, both women and men want to succeed at work, both want promotions, and both ask for raises, however, men rather women are more likely to get it. The truth is that it’s not a pipeline problem, but men are refusing to hear the noise of women trying to break the glass ceiling. It can be something as simple as being appreciated for the work done, or even being recommended by a senior leader for a higher role. How many are women are recommended for these by men at work?

Image credit: Harvard Business Review

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